Looking for a fall sport? Try cross country.

The Comets season has come to an end for the summer, but many of our athletes will be joining the Brocaw Blazers for the fall cross country season.

Here’s what some of our team has to say about why they love cross country in the fall.

“I love Brocaw because I get the chance to hang out with my friends and coaches while doing a workout. Also, we get to a fun trip together each year to the National Cross Country meet. Cross country makes me a better runner because we do core and balances every practice to help us get stronger.”
~Haley, Age 13

“I love Brocaw because I love running! The team gives me an opportunity to do what I love with a fun group of kids that also love to run. It makes me a better runner because I’m able to train alongside some of the best runners in the country, on a team that is consistently among the best in the nation.”
~Eloise, Age 10

“Being a part of the Brocaw Blazers has been a great experience. Coach Ramsey is an awesome coach who really cares about all of his runners. I have not only made progress as a runner, but made a bunch of friends!”
~Jack, Age 14

It’s not just the athletes that like cross country. The Comets coaches support the Brocaw Blazers in a variety of ways and encourage runners to consider cross country as a good fall activity.

“Running cross country in the fall is a great way to develop a foundation of strength and endurance. Besides just being a fun experience, the fitness that is gained and the the skills that are developed during the cross country season can definitely help an athlete to approach their spring/summer track season with greater confidence and enthusiasm.”
~Chris Boos, Head Coach

“Running cross country is a great experience for any track and field athlete. It is going to push you in ways track hasn’t and make you an all around tougher runner. The aerobic boost you will get from cross country will definitely help you into track in the spring! Especially 400m and 800m specialist. In cross country, your teammates quickly become family as you all train and focus on the same race and goal. I highly encourage all athletes to at least try cross country for one season.”
~Ethan Ferrell, Assistant Coach – Sprints

This area cross country club attracts about 200 athletes metro wide and practices in three convenient locations. Practices begin August 29. Visit the Brocaw Blazers website for more information.

Comets 2021 Regional Recap Reel

The Comets headed to Bentonville for the AAU Region 16 Qualifier! They dared to dream. And had the “most fun they’ve ever had!” Enjoy the Regional Recap Reel!

Congrats to all the athletes for their performance in Arkansas! The Comets had over 30 athletes qualify for the AAU Junior Olympics!

Thank you to the Comet’s own rising director, Archer Brown, for editing this video. You make us look so good!

Stay fueled on race day

Photo By; https://flickr.com/photos/youngrocky/

Do you do the long-jump and run the 4x400m? Buckle up. Even if your events are somewhere in-between those, on competition day, you are in for a LONG day at the track! What should you eat to stay ready all day? It’s all about preparation and knowing your body. Take a look at the tips below for how to stay fueled to run your best at a track meet.

  1. Make sure to fuel the day before your meet! Stick to foods you are familiar with and think lots of healthy carbs, lean proteins and not a lot of fats. Stick with normal portion sizes. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water with and between each meal throughout the day.
  2. Day of the meet, eat a well balanced breakfast that your body is familiar with, is easy to digest and has whole foods. Include carbs, some lean proteins and healthy fats. Avoid overly sugary/simple carbs, your body will burn through those too quickly.

    Ideas:
    -Toast, English muffin or bagel with peanut butter, glass of low fat milk, a banana and water
    -Eggs, toast and peanut butter, glass of low fat milk, berries and water
    -Low fat yogurt, not very sugary granola that has some nuts, banana, glass of juice and water
  3. Pack snacks! Everyone’s body is different, but be sure you are eating with plenty of time before your race for your body to digest, especially if you are running longer races. You should be eating something small every 2-3 hours at the meet, and within 60 minutes post race. Keep the snacks simple to digest and portions small.

    Ideas:
    -Banana (the runner’s favorite fruit! Packed with potassium which will help ward off cramps.)
    -Bagel (yummy carbs!)-Gatorade (restores electrolytes you burned off while running)
    -Peanut butter & crackers (protein, good fats, and carbs!)
    -Berries, apples, oranges
  4. Pack water! It is essential that you stay hydrated at your track meet. Your body loses a significant amount of water being in the hot sun all day. Your performance can suffer even with small levels of dehydration. Don’t gorge all at once though, drink a small but steady amount of water throughout the day.
  5. Post meet. After pushing yourself, your body is like a sponge ready to absorb nutrients to help repair, rebuild and refuel your muscles. Focus on refueling with carbohydrates and lean proteins with a small amount of healthy fats.

Sidelined with injury, now what?

Rehab'ing my hurt knee

Being injured doesn’t mean you have to sit on the sidelines completely. The road to recovery can be a long and bumpy ride, but there are a few things you can do to stay race ready while you rest. Coach Torres offers his tips for managing injuries during the running season.

  1. Rest to Recover
    At the top of the list is rest. You must take time out from running to recovery. Rest the muscle or injured area as much as possible.
  2. Ice Therapy
    It is an age old idea that stands the test of time. Ice the area 2 to 3 times a day for 15 to 20 minutes.
  3. Basic Needs
    Maslow was onto something with his Hierarchy of Needs. At the bottom, making the foundation for the pyramid of needs, were the basic needs of food, shelter, water, and rest. Get plenty of sleep and drink water! Your body needs to heal and sleep and hydration are important factors in that process. Here’s a fun Lifehack article that explains the Hierarchy of Needs using sports to explain each level of needs.
  4. Cross Train
    Being sidelined doesn’t mean you have to sit out completely. Cross train with a low impact exercise. Cycling, swimming or yoga would be great alternatives while you rest and recover.
  5. Stay Positive
    As they say, “this too shall pass.” Most importantly, keep a positive mental attitude!! Focusing on the good helps you to see the light at the end of the tunnel. Learn more about beating injury with a positive attitude in this article from Men’s Running.

If the injury persists, go to the doctor. Some injuries will require additional mediation to recover.

It’s H-O-T! Can I still run?

It’s hot! Can I still run?

This simple answer is yes, running is a year-round sport. Heat can cause complications like dehydration, muscle cramps, and exhaustion. The good news is, there are simple and easy ways to stay active when it’s hot outside. Coach Boos offers his top three tips for athletes.

  1. Stay Hydrated
    This does not mean drink water right when it is time to run. Drink water throughout the day to stay hydrated. Remember, the three most important times to drink water are first thing in the morning, one hour before your run, and right before bed. How much water should you drink? That’s a complicated question, but here is what WebMD recommends.
  2. Dress for Success
    Wear light-toned, breathable clothing when exercising in the heat.
  3. Assess Yourself
    Listen to your body. Check for your signs and symptoms of heat-related illness. If you start to experience any dizziness, nausea, chills, or stop sweating, cease exercising and let your coach or running partner know immediately. They can help you get the care you need.

Pro Tip from a Running Mom: To cool down quickly, place cold compress or ice on your pressure points – wrists, inside of the elbow, back of the knee, and neck.

For more information on running in the heat, read this article from Road Runner’s Club of America.